Recipe: Swineapple on the Big Green Egg

swineapple.jpg

As we were reading this recipe over, we wondered:  Why do two totally different tastes like pork and pineapple work together?  It's like these two flavors work together to maximize their potential!  Turns out, there is legit science behind a lot of our favorite strange food pairings.

Fatty foods like pork leave our mouths feeling fatty, a not-so-yummy feeling.  The pineapple, being naturally acidic, cuts through that fatty result, creates a balance, and results in a more desirable mouthfeel.  

Another bit of science for you:  We humans have a natural attraction to the smell of Maillard reactions occurring. Pork also contains quite a bit of salt, and our love affair with salt is undeniable.  Perhaps our love of salt can be traced (get it? trace mineral?) back to our basic need for this mineral. Salt reduces bitterness and enhances those Maillard reactions....so again, SCIENCE!  Plus, according to everyone here who grills out often, BACON makes everything better!

Now, back to the recipe:  

  • Set your Big Green Egg for indirect cooking with the convEGGtor to 240 degrees. Cut the pork tenderloin to about the size of your pineapple. Rub the tenderloin with your favorite pork rub.  
  • Cut the bottom off your pineapple and set it aside. Peel the outer layer of the pineapple.  Hollow out the inside of your pineapple using a sharp knife and small ice cream scoop.
  • Stuff the pork into your hollowed pineapple. Then wrap the pineapple with strips of bacon and secure with toothpicks.
  • Sprinkle with Dizzy Pig Pineapple Head Seasoning.
  • Attach the cut bottom to the end of the pineapple with toothpicks.
  • Place on grill and cook for one to one and a half hours or until the interanl temperature of the tenderloin reaches 145 degrees.  
  • Slice and serve.

There you have it...pork tenderloin, pineapple, bacon.  A drool-inducing combination.

Jason Windsor

Greensboro, NC, USA

Eater-in-Chief

Jason Windsor is a pretty pretty princess.